How to add a verbal assessment based on the calculated score?

You can use the IFS function to check the score and display verbal assessments accordingly.

Oxford Happiness Questionnaire

The Oxford Happiness Questionnaire can be used to measure the current level of happiness. This happiness questionnaire consists of 29 statements. The items are a combination of positively and negatively phrased statements and pertain to different areas of well-being. This ensures that the respondent takes time to carefully read each item before answering. The survey asks you to evaluate each statement and rate it according to how much you disagree or agree with the statement. It uses a 6-point Likert scale with 6 being the highest as “strongly agree”.

For the purpose of this article, we will focus on how to interpret the results and show a verbal assessment based on the score. To learn how to calculate the score, refer to this help article

Interpreting the score, by Stephen Wright

  • 1-2: Not happy. If you answered honestly and got a very low score, you are probably seeing yourself and your situation as worse than it really is. Try taking the Depression Symptoms test.
  • 2-3: Somewhat unhappy. Try exercises like the Gratitude Journal & Gratitude Lists, or the Gratitude Visit.
  • 3-4: Not particularly happy or unhappy. A score of 3.5 would be an exact numerical average of happy and unhappy responses. Exercises designed to increase happiness have been tested in scientific studies and have been shown to make people lastingly happier.
  • 4: Somewhat happy or moderately happy. Satisfied. This is what the average person scores.
  • 4-5: Pretty happy. Satisfied. This is what the average person scores
  • 5-6: Very happy. Being happy has more benefits than just feeling good. It is correlated with benefits like health, better marriages, and attaining your goals.
  • 6: Too happy. Yes, you read that right. Recent research seems to show that there is an optimal level of happiness for things like doing well at work or school, or for being healthy, and that being too happy may be associated with lower levels of such things.

Please follow the instructions below to display the verbal assessment based on the calculated score.

IFS function

IFS function evaluates multiple conditions and returns a value that corresponds to the first true condition. The syntax for the IFS function is:

IFS(condition1, value1, [condition2, value2, …])

where

  • condition1 - The first condition to be evaluated.
  • value1 - The returned value if condition1 is TRUE.
  • condition2, value2, … - Additional conditions and values if the first one is evaluated to be false.

For example:
IFS(entry789920950 == 6, "Too happy", entry789920950 > 5, "Very happy", entry789920950 > 4, "Pretty happy", entry789920950 == 4, "Moderately happy", entry789920950 > 3, "Unhappy", entry789920950 > 2, "Somewhat unhappy", entry789920950 > 1, "Not happy")

Important

1. Type @ and select the score question from the list to add its entry #id in the IFS formula.

2. IFS function must be written between ${ and } in the confirmation message. For example:

${IFS(entry789920950 == 6, "Too happy", entry789920950 > 5, "Very happy", entry789920950 > 4, "Pretty happy", entry789920950 == 4, "Moderately happy", entry789920950 > 3, "Unhappy", entry789920950 > 2, "Somewhat unhappy", entry789920950 > 1, "Not happy")}